The OhBree Experience

The band, OhBree, brings theatrics to West Philly’s local music scene.

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OhBree, a band composed of seven Drexel University Students, is storming onto the music scene with a theatrical presence. Drawing from pit orchestra bands, drone metal, ska, pep bands, and theatre, they’re creating an entirely new genre of music and entertainment.

Going to an OhBree show is a lot like attending a carnival bizarre, with their use of kazoos, trumpets, horns, and costumes. The band plays a wide variety of instruments including—piano, trumpet, trombone, saxophone, drums, guitar, and bass. Andrew Scott, the lead singer, describes their sound as “theatrical, eerie, and unsettling.” Their shows involve lots of crowd participation, like moshing and loud shouting. Whether it’s jumping and screaming or doing the twist, all of which I’ve seen crowd members do, you won’t be able to keep yourself from dancing at an OhBree show.

Andrew Scott laughs and tells me that the band is just “goofy,” however their sound is anything but immature. It might sound completely crazy to mix metal with the more refined sounds of an orchestra pit band, but that fusing of unusual sounds is what makes OhBree unique amongst local college bands.

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The band dresses up in full costume for all of their shows. You can expect to see masks, glitter, face paint, and theatrical hats during an OhBree performance. When asked why they dress up, the band said it was inspired by their first show—a Halloween performance at Sprinkle Kingdom where they all dressed up as “goons.” It gave the band the theatrical element they wanted, so sticking with it was a no brainer. Dressing up adds to their performance

In the band, no member goes unnoticed. Balancing the sound of all seven members may sound tough, but band members agree that the best way to showcase each sound is for “everyone to play as loud as possible,” says Scott.


Jeana Mobley is a Sophomore Custom-Designed Major at Drexel University.


Images courtesy of OhBree
Photo Credit: Jake Beadenkopf